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INVEST IN THE LATINO PUBLIC POLICY CENTER – AND IN ARIZONA'S FUTURE

 

 

NEW REPORT ON BORDER SECURITY

 

 

RECENT REPORTS

 

Citizenship or Something Less?

Economic Implications for Arizona


This report looks at the economic impact regarding permanent residency vs. U.S. citizenship, as part of the options in the immigration reform package being considered by Congress. Arizona’s overall economy would benefit significantly if undocumented immigrants become U.S. citizens instead of simply legal residents, according to “Citizenship or Something Less? Economic Implications for Arizona.

Cover: Immigration briefThe new analysis by the Morrison Institute Latino Public Policy Center was researched and written by policy analyst Mike Slaven, who notes there are about 190,000 undocumented workers in Arizona, and that:

"A reasonable, conservative estimate is that a path to citizenship could mean about $174 million to $246 million in additional individual income a year in Arizona, and these additional earnings would go mostly to low-income families, making them more financially secure."

 

When including the state multiplier effect of $1.17 economic impact per additional $1 in income, the actual impact for Arizona would be closer to $300 million per year as a result of U.S. citizenship, according to the report.


 


English Language Learners: What's at Stake for Arizona?

ELL Cover

 

Morrison Institute Latino Public Policy Center and Arizona Indicators have released a new report on English Language Learner (ELL) programs in Arizona, which last year saw the 20th anniversary of Flores v. Arizona, the original lawsuit regarding English learners in Arizona. 

“The report is both comprehensive and timely, with ELL-related discussions presently taking place in the Legislature that would remove ELL from the throes of political ideologies and return oversight to the State Board of Education,” said Joseph Garcia, director of the Morrison Institute Latino Public Policy Center.

Dr. Oscar Jiménez-Castellanos of Arizona State University and Dr. Mary Carol Combs of the University of Arizona are chief authors of the report, "English Language Learners: What’s at Stake for Arizona?Jiménez-Castellanos, an assistant professor in ASU’s Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, is co-editor of the Association of Mexican-American Educators (AMAE) Journal and a 2012-13 Ford Post-Doctoral Fellow. Combs is an associate lecturer in the UA Department of Language, Reading and Culture who teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in bilingual education law and policy, ESL methods and multicultural education. 

READ THE REPORT: English Language Learners: What's at Stake for Arizona

NEWS RELEASE: New report on English Language Learner (ELL) saga released

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Arizona's Emerging Latino Vote


LatinoVoterCoverWith state and national elections approaching, Arizona facesa familiar but potent question: Is this the year the state’s large population of Latino potential voters make themselves heard at the ballot box? There are reasonable arguments on both sides. But there’s also a larger, more important question to be asked about Arizona politics: Is the balance of electoral power shifting towards Latinos and thus — based on their historic political preferences — toward electing more Independents and Democrats? Will this transform Arizona from a red to a blue state? Arizona's Emerging Latino Vote seeks to answer those questions and more.


 

LATINO CENTER ARCHIVES AND LINKS

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LATINO POLICY BLOGS, VIDEOS, BRIEFINGS

 

 

LATINO PUBLIC POLICY IN THE NEWS


LATINO CEN
TER'S MISSION

Why must Arizona better understand 'Latino issues?' Because they are 'Arizona issues,' determining our state'
s future Arizona is expected to become a “majority-minority” state perhaps within the next two decades, with its younger citizens largely Latino.

Eighty-two percent of the state's Latino youth under age 20 are naturalized citizens or were born in the United States. For Arizona Latino children under 5 years old, 97 percent are U.S. citizens. Latinos are Arizonans. And they represent our state's future.

With our state's workforce, electorate, economic drivers and leadership largely affected and dependent on informed public policy as it relates to Arizona Latino citizens, Morrison Institute established a new center to house a growing collection of related articles, analysis, videos, blogs and polls, as well as further the dialogue through presentations and forums.

Morri
son Institute Latino Public Policy Center was launched in October 2012 with a mission to provide a better understanding of how Latino public policy issues affect all of Arizona and our shared future opportunity.

Joseph Garcia, Latino Center director


IMMIGRATION ISSUES

 

 

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